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ARIZONA ENABLING ACT

Act June 20, 1910, c. 310, 36 U.S.Stat. 557, 568—579

Sections 1 to 18, inclusive of the Act of June 20, 1910, enabled the people of Territory of New

Mexico to form a constitution and state government.

Sec. 19.

Sec. 19. That the qualified electors of the Territory of Arizona are hereby authorized to vote for

and choose delegates to form a constitutional convention for said Territory for the purpose of framing

a constitution for the proposed State of Arizona. Said convention shall consist of fifty-two delegates;

and the governor, chief justice, and secretary of said Territory shall apportion the delegates to be thus

selected, as nearly as may be, equitably among the several counties thereof in accordance with the

voting population as shown by the vote cast at the election for Delegate in Congress in said Territory

nineteen hundred and eight.

A qualified elector within the meaning of this section shall be any male citizen of the United

States of the age of twenty-one years who shall have resided in the Territory at least twelve months

next preceding the date fixed for the election of delegates to the constitutional convention, as herein

provided for, and who shall possess in other respects the qualifications of an elector as provided by

title twenty, Revised Statutes of Arizona, August second, nineteen hundred and one. Within ten days

after the issuance of the governor’s proclamation ordering the election of delegates to the

constitutional convention, as herein provided, the board of supervisors of each county of the Territory

shall meet and authorize and require a reregistration of the qualified electors of said county: Provided,

however, that there need not be reregistration of the qualified electors whose names appear on the

great register of said county for the year nineteen hundred and eight, but all such names, together with

such as may be registered under the provisions of this section shall constitute the great register of said

county and be used at each of the elections herein provided for; and so far as the same is consistent

with the provisions of this act, such registration, as also the making up, printing, distribution, and use

of such great register, shall in all respects conform to and be governed by the provisions of chapter

three of said title twenty, Revised Statutes of Arizona, nineteen hundred and one. And the provisions

of this section shall apply to all voters at all elections for the election of delegates to the constitutional

convention and for the ratification of the constitution, for state officers, members of the state

legislature, representatives in congress, and all other officers named in said constitution or in any

manner herein provided for or mentioned.

The governor of said Territory shall, within thirty days after the approval of this Act, by

proclamation, in which the aforesaid apportionment of delegates to the convention shall be fully

specified and announced, order an election of the delegates aforesaid on a day, designated by him in

said proclamation, not earlier than sixty nor later than ninety days after the approval of this Act. Such

election for delegates shall be held and conducted, the returns made, and the certificates of persons

elected to such convention issued, as nearly as may be, in the same manner as is prescribed by the

laws of said Territory regulating elections therein of members of the legislature existing at the time of

the last election of said members of the legislature; and the provisions of said laws in all respects,

including the qualifications of electors and registration, are hereby made applicable to the election

herein provided for; and said convention when so called to order and organized shall be the sole judge

of the election and qualifications of its own members. Qualifications to entitle persons to vote on the

ratification or rejection of the constitution formed by said convention when said constitution shall be

submitted to the people of said Territory hereunder shall be the same as the qualifications to entitle

persons to vote for delegates to said convention..2

Sec. 20.

Sec. 20. That the delegates to the convention thus elected shall meet in the hall of the house of

representatives in the capitol of the Territory of Arizona at twelve o’clock noon on the fourth Monday

after their election, and they shall receive compensation for the period they actually are in session, but

not for more than sixty days in all; after organization they shall declare on behalf of the people of said

proposed State that they adopt the Constitution of the United States, whereupon the said convention

shall be, and is hereby, authorized to form a constitution and provide for a state government for said

proposed State, all in the manner and under the conditions contained in this Act. The constitution

shall be republican in form and make no distinction in civil or political rights on account of race or

color, and shall not be repugnant to the Constitution of the United States and the principles of the

Declaration of Independence.

And said convention shall provide, by an ordinance irrevocable without the consent of the United

States and the people of said State—

First. That perfect toleration of religious sentiment shall be secured, and that no inhabitant of said

State shall ever be molested in person or property on account of his or her mode of religious worship;

and that polygamous or plural marriages, or polygamous cohabitation, and the sale, barter, or giving

of intoxicating liquors to Indians, and the introduction of liquors into Indian country are forever

prohibited.

Second. That the people inhabiting said proposed State do agree and declare that they forever

disclaim all right and title to the unappropriated and ungranted public lands lying within the

boundaries thereof and to all lands lying within said boundaries owned or held by any Indian or

Indian tribes, the right or title to which shall have been acquired through or from the United States or

any prior sovereignty, and that until the title of such Indian or Indian tribes shall have been

extinguished the same shall be and remain subject to the disposition and under the absolute

jurisdiction and control of the Congress of the United States; that the lands and other property

belonging to citizens of the United States residing without the said State shall never be taxed at a

higher rate than the lands and other property belonging to residents thereof; that no taxes shall be

imposed by the State upon lands or property therein belonging to or which may hereafter be acquired

by the United States or reserved for its use; but nothing herein, or in the ordinance herein provided

for, shall preclude the said State from taxing as other lands and other property are taxed any lands and

other property outside of an Indian reservation owned or held by any Indian, save and except such

lands as have been granted or acquired as aforesaid or as may be granted or confirmed to any Indian

or Indians under any Act of Congress, but said ordinance shall provide that all such lands shall be

exempt from taxation by said State so long and to such extent as Congress has prescribed or may

hereafter prescribe.

Third. That the debts and liabilities of said Territory of Arizona, and the debts of the counties

thereof, which shall be valid and subsisting at the time of the passage of this Act, shall be assumed

and paid by said proposed State, and that said State shall, as to all such debts and liabilities, be

subrogated to all the rights, including rights of indemnity and reimbursement, existing in favor of said

Territory or of any of the several counties thereof at the time of the passage of this Act: Provided that

nothing in this Act shall be construed as validating or in any manner legalizing any territorial, county,

municipal, or other bonds, obligations, or evidences of indebtedness of said Territory or the counties

or municipalities thereof which now are or may be invalid or illegal at the time said proposed State is

admitted, nor shall the Legislature of said proposed State pass any law in any manner validating or

legalizing the same.

Fourth. That provisions shall be made for the establishment and maintenance of a system of

public schools which shall be open to all the children of said State and free from sectarian control;

and that said schools shall always be conducted in English.

Fifth. That said State shall never enact any law restricting or abridging the right of suffrage on

account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude, and that ability to read, write, speak, and

understand the English language sufficiently well to conduct the duties of the office without the aid of.3

an interpreter shall be a necessary qualification for all state officers and members of the state

legislature.

Sixth. That the capital of said State shall, until changed by the electors voting at an election

provided for by the legislature of said State for that purpose, be at the City of Phoenix, but no election

shall be called or provided for prior to the thirty-first day of December, nineteen hundred and

twenty-five.

Seventh. That there be and are reserved to the United States, with full acquiescence of the State,

all rights and powers for the carrying out of the provisions by the United States of the Act of

Congress entitled “An act appropriating the receipts from the sale and disposal of public lands in

certain States and Territories to the construction of irrigation works for the reclamation of arid lands,”

approved June seventeenth, nineteen hundred and two, and Acts amendatory thereof or

supplementary thereto, 1 to the same extent as if said State had remained a Territory.

Eighth. That whenever hereafter any of the lands contained within Indian reservations or

allotments in said proposed State shall be allotted, sold, reserved, or otherwise disposed of, they shall

be subject, for a period of twenty-five years after such allotment, sale, reservation, or other disposal,

to all the laws of the United States prohibiting the introduction of liquor into the Indian country.

Ninth. That the State and its people consent to all and singular the provisions of this Act

concerning the lands hereby granted or confirmed to the State, the terms and conditions upon which

said grants and confirmations are made, and the means and manner of enforcing such terms and

conditions, all in every respect and particular as in this Act provided.

All of which ordinance described in this section shall, by proper reference, be made a part of any

constitution that shall be formed hereunder, in such terms as shall positively preclude the making of

any future constitutional amendment of any change or abrogation of the said ordinance in whole or in

part without the consent of Congress.

1 See 43 U.S.C.A §§ 372, 373, 381, 383, 391, 392, 411, 416,

419, 421, 431, 432, 434, 439, 461, 476, 491, 498.

Sec. 21.

Sec. 21. That when said constitution shall be formed, as aforesaid, the convention forming the

same shall provide for the submission of said constitution to the people of Arizona for ratification at

an election which shall be held on a day named by said convention not earlier than sixty nor later than

ninety days after said convention adjourns, at which election the qualified voters of Arizona shall vote

directly for or against said constitution and for or against any provisions thereof separately submitted.

The returns of said election shall be made by the election officers direct to the secretary of the

Territory of Arizona at Phoenix, who, with the governor and chief justice of said Territory, shall

constitute a canvassing board, and they or any two of them, shall meet at said city of Phoenix on the

third Monday after said election and shall canvass the same. If a majority of the legal votes cast at

said election shall reject the constitution, the said canvassing board shall forthwith certify said result

to the governor of said Territory together with the statement of votes cast upon the question of the

ratification or rejection of said constitution and also a statement of the votes cast for or against such

provisions thereof as were separately submitted to the voters at said election; whereupon the governor

of said Territory shall, by proclamation, order the constitutional convention to reassemble at a date

not later than twenty days after the receipt by said governor of the documents showing the rejection of

the constitution by the people, and thereafter a new constitution shall be framed and the same

proceedings shall be taken in regard thereto in like manner as if said constitution were being

originally prepared for submission and submitted to the people.

Sec. 22.

Sec. 22. That when said constitution and such provisions thereof as have been separately

submitted shall have been duly ratified by the people of Arizona, as aforesaid, a certified copy of the

same shall be submitted to the President of the United States and to Congress for approval, together.4

with the statement of the votes cast thereon and upon any provisions thereof which were separately

submitted to and voted upon by the people. And if Congress and the President approve said

constitution and the said separate provisions thereof, if any, or if the President approves the same and

Congress fails to disapprove the same during the next regular session thereof, then and in that event

the President shall certify said facts to the governor of Arizona, who shall, within thirty days after the

receipt of said notification from the President of the United States, issue his proclamation for the

election of the state and county officers, the members of the state legislature, and Representative in

Congress, and all other officers provided for in said Constitution, all as hereinafter provided; said

election to take place not earlier than sixty days nor later than ninety days after said proclamation by

the governor of Arizona ordering the same.

Sec. 23.

Sec. 23. That said constitutional convention shall, by ordinance, provide that in case of the

ratification of said constitution by the people, and in case the President of the United States and

Congress approve the same, or in case the President approve the same and Congress fails to act in its

next regular session, all as hereinbefore provided, an election shall be held at the time named in the

proclamation of the governor of Arizona, provided for in the preceding section, at which election of

officers for a full state government, including a governor, members of the legislature, one

Representative in Congress, and such other officers as such constitutional convention shall prescribe,

shall be chosen by the people. Such election shall be held, the returns thereof made, canvassed, and

certified to by the Secretary of said Territory, in the same manner as in this Act prescribed for the

making of the returns, the canvassing and certification of the same of the election for the ratification

or rejection of said constitution, as hereinbefore provided, and the qualifications of the voters at said

election for all state officers, members of the legislature, County officers, and Representative in

Congress, and other officers prescribed by said constitution shall be made the same as the

qualifications of voters at the election for the ratification or rejection of said constitution, as

hereinbefore provided. When said election of state and county officers, members of the legislature,

and Representative in Congress, and other officers above provided for shall be held and the returns

thereof made, canvassed, and certified, as hereinbefore provided, the governor of the Territory of

Arizona shall certify the result of said election as canvassed and certified, as herein provided, to the

President of the United States, who thereupon shall immediately issue his proclamation announcing

the result of said election so ascertained, and upon the issuance of said proclamation by the President

of the United States the proposed State of Arizona shall be deemed admitted by Congress into the

Union by virtue of this Act on an equal footing with other States. Until the issuance of said

proclamation by the President of the United States, and until the said State is so admitted into the

Union and said officers are elected and qualified under the provisions of the Constitution, the County

and Territorial officers of said Territory, including the Delegate in Congress thereof elected in the

general election in nineteen hundred and eight, shall continue to discharge the duties of their

respective offices in and for said Territory: Provided, that no session of the Territorial Legislative

Assembly shall be held in nineteen hundred and eleven.

Sec. 24.

Sec. 24. That in addition to sections sixteen and thirty-six heretofore reserved for the Territory of

Arizona, sections two and thirty-two in every township in said proposed State not otherwise

appropriated at the date of the passage of this Act are hereby granted to the said State for the support

of common schools; and where sections two, sixteen, thirty-two, and thirty-six, or any part thereof,

are mineral, or have been sold, reserved, or otherwise appropriated or reserved by or under the

authority of any Act of Congress, or are wanting or fractional in quantity, or where settlement thereon

with a view to pre-emption or homestead, or improvement thereof with a view to desert-land entry

has been made the survey thereof in the field, the provisions of sections twenty-two hundred and

seventy-five and twenty-two hundred and seventy-six of the Revised Statutes, and Acts amendatory.5

thereof or supplementary thereto,1 are hereby made applicable thereto and to the selection of lands in

lieu thereof to the same extent as if sections two and thirty-two, as well as sections sixteen and thirty-six,

were mentioned therein: Provided, however, that the area of such indemnity selections on account

of any fractional township shall not in any event exceed an area which, when added to the area of the

above-named sections returned by the survey as in place, will equal four sections for fractional

townships containing seventeen thousand two hundred and eighty acres or more, three sections for

such townships containing eleven thousand five hundred and twenty acres or more, two sections for

such townships containing five thousand seven hundred and sixty acres or more, nor one section for

such townships containing six hundred and forty acres or more: And provided further, that the grants

of sections two, sixteen, thirty-two, and thirty-six to said State, within national forests now existing or

proclaimed, shall not vest the title to said sections in said State until the part of said national forests

embracing any of said sections is restored to the public domain; but said granted sections shall be

administered as a part of said forests, and at the close of each fiscal year there shall be paid by the

Secretary of the Treasury to the State, as income for its common school fund, such proportion of the

gross proceeds of all the national forests within said State as the area of lands hereby granted to said

State for school purposes which are situated within said forest reserves, whether surveyed or

unsurveyed, and for which no indemnity has been selected, may bear to the total area of said sections

when unsurveyed to be determined by the Secretary of the Interior, by protraction or otherwise, the

amount necessary for such payments being appropriated and made available annually from any

money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated.

1 See 43 U.S.C.A. §§ 851, 852.

Sec. 25.

Sec. 25. That in lieu of the grant of land for purposes of internal improvements made to new

States by the eighth section of the Act of September fourth, eighteen hundred and forty-one,1 and in

lieu of the swamp land grant made by the Act of September twenty-eight, eighteen hundred and fifty,2

and section twenty-four hundred and seventy-nine of the Revised Statutes,3 and in lieu of the grant of

thirty thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in Congress, made by the Act of July

second, eighteen hundred and three,4 which grants are hereby declared not to extend to the said State,

the following grants are hereby made, to-wit:

For university purposes, two hundred thousand acres; for legislative, executive, and judicial

public buildings heretofore erected in said Territory or to be hereafter erected in the proposed State,

and for the payment of the bonds heretofore or hereafter issued therefor, one hundred thousand acres;

for penitentiaries, one hundred thousand acres; for insane asylums, one hundred thousand acres; for

school and asylums for the deaf, dumb, and blind, one hundred thousand acres; for miners’ hospitals

for disabled miners, fifty thousand acres; for normal schools, two hundred thousand acres; for state

charitable, penal, and reformatory institutions, one hundred thousand acres; for agricultural and

mechanical colleges, one hundred and fifty thousand acres; and the national appropriation heretofore

annually paid for the agricultural and mechanical college to said Territory shall until further order of

Congress, continue to be paid to said State for the use of said institution; for school of mines, one

hundred and fifty thousand acres; for military institutes, one hundred thousand acres; and for the

payment of the bonds and accrued interest thereon issued by Maricopa, Pima, Yavapai, and Coconino

Counties, Arizona, which said bonds were validated, approved, and confirmed by the Act of Congress

of June sixth, eighteen hundred and ninety-six (Twenty-ninth Statutes, page two hundred and

sixty-two) one million acres: Provided, that if there shall remain any of the one million acres of land

so granted, or of the proceeds of the sale or lease thereof, or rents, issues, or other profits therefrom,

after the payment of said debts, such remainder of lands and the proceeds of sales thereof shall be

added to and become a part of the permanent school fund of said State, the income therefrom only to

be used for the maintenance of the common schools of said State.

1 Sec 43 U.S.C.A. § 857.

2 See 43 U.S.C.A. § 982 et seq..6

3 See 43 U.S.C.A. § 982.

4 Probably should read “eighteen hundred and sixty-two”. See 7 U.S.C.A. § 301 et seq.

Sec. 26.

Sec. 26. That the schools, colleges, and universities provided for in this Act shall forever remain

under the exclusive control of the said State, and no part of the proceeds arising from the sale or

disposal of any lands granted herein for educational purposes shall be used for the support of any

sectarian or denominational school, college, or university.

Sec. 27.

Sec. 27. That five per centum of the proceeds of sales of public lands lying within said State

which shall be sold by the United States subsequent to the admission of said State into the Union,

after deducting all the expenses incident to such sales, shall be paid to the said State to be used as a

permanent inviolable fund, the interest of which only shall be expended for the support of the

common schools within said State.

Sec. 28.

Sec. 28. That it is hereby declared that all lands hereby granted, including those which, having

been heretofore granted to said Territory, are hereby expressly transferred and confirmed to the said

State, shall be by the said State held in trust, to be disposed of in whole or in part only in manner as

herein provided and for the several objects specified in the respective granting and confirmatory

provisions, and that the natural products and money proceeds of any of said lands shall be subject to

the same trusts as the lands producing the same.

Disposition of any of said lands, or of any money or thing of value directly or indirectly derived

therefrom, for any object other than for such particular lands, or the lands from which such money or

thing of value shall have been derived, were granted or confirmed, or in any manner contrary to the

provisions of this Act, shall be deemed a breach of trust.

No mortgage or other encumbrance of the said lands, or any part thereof, shall be valid in favor of

any person or for any purpose or under any circumstances whatsoever. Said lands shall not be sold or

leased, in whole or in part, except to the highest and best bidder at a public auction to be held at the

county seat of the county wherein the lands to be affected, or the major portion thereof, shall lie,

notice of which public auction shall first have been duly given by advertisement, which shall set forth

the nature, time, and place of transaction to be had, with a full description of the lands to be offered,

and be published once each week for not less than ten successive weeks in a newspaper of general

circulation published regularly at the state capital, and in that newspaper of like circulation which

shall then be regularly published nearest to the location of the lands so offered; nor shall any sale or

contract for the sale of any timber or other natural product of such lands be made, save at the place, in

the manner, and after the notice by publication provided for sales and leases of the lands themselves.

Nothing herein contained shall prevent: (1) the leasing of any of the lands referred to in this section,

in such manner as the Legislature of the State of Arizona may prescribe, for grazing, agricultural,

commercial, and domestic purposes, for a term of ten years or less; (2) the leasing of any of said

lands, in such manner as the Legislature of the State of Arizona may prescribe, whether or not also

leased for grazing and agricultural purposes, for mineral purposes, other than for the exploration,

development, and production of oil, gas, and other hydrocarbon substances, for a term of twenty years

or less; (3) the leasing of any said lands, whether or not also leased for other purposes, for the

exploration, development, and production of oil, gas and other hydrocarbon substances on, in, or

under lands for an initial term of twenty years or less and as long thereafter as oil, gas, or other

hydrocarbon substance may be produced there from in paying quantities, the leases to be made in any

manner, with or without advertisement, bidding, or appraisement, and under such terms and

provisions as the Legislature of the State of Arizona may prescribe, the terms and provisions to.7

include a reservation of a royalty to said State of not less than 12 1/2 per centum of production; or (4)

the Legislature of the State of Arizona from providing by proper laws of the protection of lessees of

said lands, whereby such lessees shall be protected in their rights to their improvements (including

water rights) in such manner that in case of lease or sale of said lands to other parties the former

lessee shall be paid by the succeeding lessee or purchaser the value of such improvements and rights

placed thereon by such lessee. As amended June 5, 1936, c. 517, 49 Stat. 1477; June 2, 1951, c. 120,

65 Stat. 51.

All lands, leaseholds, timber and other products of land, before being offered, shall be appraised

at their true value, and no sale or other disposal thereof shall be made for a consideration less than the

value so ascertained, nor upon credit unless accompanied by ample security, and the legal title shall

not be deemed to have passed until the consideration shall have been paid. As amended June 5, 1936,

c. 517, 49 Stat. 1477.

No lands shall be sold for less than their appraised value, and no lands which are or shall be

susceptible of irrigation under any projects now or hereafter completed or adopted by the United

States under legislation for the reclamation of lands, or under any other project for the reclamation of

lands, shall be sold at less than twenty-five dollars per acre: Provided, that said State, at the request of

the Secretary of the Interior, shall from time to time relinquish such of its lands to the United States as

at any time are needed for irrigation works in connection with any such government project. And

other lands in lieu thereof are hereby granted to said State, to be selected from lands of the character

named and in the manner prescribed in section twenty-four of this Act. As amended June 5, 1936, c.

517, 49 Stat. 1477.

The State of Arizona is authorized to exchange any lands owned by it for other lands, public or

private, under such regulations as the legislature thereof may prescribe: Provided, That such

exchanges involving public lands may be made only as authorized by Acts of Congress and

regulations thereunder. Added June 5, 1936, c. 517, 49 Stat. 1477.

There is hereby reserved to the United States and excepted from the operation of any and all

grants made or confirmed by this act to said proposed State all land actually or prospectively valuable

for the development of water power or power for hydro-electric use or transmission and which shall

be ascertained and designated by the Secretary of the Interior within five years after the proclamation

of the President declaring the admission of the State; and no land so reserved and excepted shall be

subject to any disposition whatsoever of said State, and any conveyance or transfer of such land by

said State or any officer thereof shall be absolutely null and void within the period above named; and

in lieu of the land so reserved to the United States and excepted from the operation of any of said

grants there be, and is hereby, granted to the proposed State an equal quantity of land to be selected

from land of the character named and in the manner prescribed in section twenty-four of this Act.

Every sale, lease, conveyance, or contract of or concerning any of the lands hereby granted or

confirmed, or the use thereof or the natural products thereof, not made in substantial conformity with

the provisions of this Act shall be null and void, any provisions of the constitution or laws of the said

State to the contrary notwithstanding. It shall be the duty of the Attorney General of the United States to

prosecute, in the name of the United States and in its courts, such proceedings at law or in equity as

may from time to time be necessary and appropriate to enforce the provisions hereof relative to the

application and disposition of the said lands and the products thereof and the funds derived therefrom.

Nothing herein contained shall be taken as in limitation of the power of the State or of any citizen

thereof to enforce the provisions of this Act.

Sec. 29.

Sec. 29. That all lands granted in quantity, or as indemnity, by this Act, shall be selected, under

the direction and subject to the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, from the surveyed,

unreserved, unappropriated, and nonmineral public lands of the United States within the limits of said

State, by a commission composed of the governor, surveyor-general or other officer exercising the

functions of a surveyor-general, and the attorney-general of the said State, and after its admission into.8

the Union said State may procure public lands of the United States within its boundaries to be

surveyed with a view to satisfying any public land grants made to said State in the same manner

prescribed for the procurement of such surveys by Washington, Idaho, and other States by the Act of

Congress approved August eighteen, eighteen hundred and ninety-four (Twenty-eight Statutes at

Large, page three hundred and ninety-four)1 and the provisions of said Act, in so far as they relate to

such surveys and the preference right of selection, are hereby extended to the said State of Arizona.

The fees to be paid to the register and receiver for each final location or selection of one hundred and

sixty acres made hereunder shall be one dollar.

1 Sec 43 U.S.C.A. § 863.

Sec. 30.

Sec. 30. That all grants of lands heretofore made by any Act of Congress to said Territory, except to

the extent modified or repealed by this Act, are hereby ratified and confirmed to said State, subject to

the provisions of this Act: Provided, however, that nothing in this Act contained shall, directly, or

indirectly, affect any litigation now pending and to which the United States is a party, or any right or

claim therein asserted.

Sec. 31.

Sec. 31. That the said State, when admitted as aforesaid, shall constitute one judicial district, and

the circuit and district courts of said district shall be held at the capital of said State, and the said

district shall, for judicial purposes, be attached to the ninth judicial circuit. There shall be appointed

for said district one district judge, one United States Attorney, one United States Marshal. The judge

of said district shall receive a yearly salary the same as other similar judges of the United States

payable as provided by law, and shall reside in the district to which he is appointed. There shall be

appointed clerks of said courts, who shall keep their offices at the capital of said State. The regular

terms of said courts shall be held on the first Monday in April and the first Monday in October of

each year. The circuit and district courts for said district, and the judges thereof, respectively, shall

possess the same powers and jurisdiction and perform the same duties required to be performed by

the other circuit and district courts and judges of the United States, and shall be governed by the same

laws and regulations. The marshal, district attorney, and the clerks of the circuit and district courts of

said district, and all other officers and persons performing duties in the administration of justice

therein, shall severally possess the powers and perform the duties lawfully possessed and required to

be performed by similar officers in other districts of the United States, and shall, for the services they

perform, receive the fees and compensation now allowed by law to officers performing similar

services for the United States in the Territory of Arizona.

Sec. 32.

Sec. 32. That all cases of appeal or writ of error and all other proceedings heretofore lawfully

prosecuted and now pending in the Supreme Court of the United States or in the proper circuit court

of appeals upon any record from the supreme court of said Territory, and all cases of appeal or writ of

error and all other proceedings heretofore lawfully prosecuted and now pending in the Supreme Court

of the United States upon any record from a district court of said Territory, or, in any matter of habeas

corpus, upon any return or order of a district judge thereof, and all and singular the cases aforesaid

which, hereafter shall be so lawfully prosecuted and remain pending in the supreme court of the

United States or in the proper circuit court of appeals, may be heard and determined by the Supreme

Court of the United States or the proper circuit court of appeals, as the case may be. And the mandate

of execution or of further proceedings shall be directed by the Supreme Court of the United States or

the circuit court of appeals to the circuit or district court hereby established within the said State, or to

the supreme court of such State, as the nature of the case may require. And the circuit, district, and

State courts herein named shall, respectively, be the successors of the supreme court and of the

district courts of said Territory as to all such cases arising within the limits embraced within the.9

jurisdiction of said courts, respectively, with full power to proceed with the same and award mesne or

final process therein; and that from all judgments and decrees or other determinations of any court of

the said Territory, in any case begun prior to admission, the parties to such cause shall have the same

right to prosecute appeals, writs of error, and petitions for review to the Supreme Court of the United

States or to the circuit court of appeals as they would have had by law prior to the admission of said

State into the Union.

Sec. 33.

Sec. 33. That the said circuit or the said district courts, as the case may be, shall have jurisdiction

to hear and determine all trials, proceedings, and questions arising, or which may be raised, in any

case or controversy pending in any of the courts other than the supreme court of the said Territory at

the date of its admission as a State, the case being such that, under the laws of the United States

touching the jurisdiction of federal courts, it might properly have been begun in or (as a separate

controversy or otherwise) removed to said circuit or said district court had they been established when

the litigation of such case or controversy was commenced. Should such case or controversy be such

that, if begun within a State, it would have fallen within the exclusive original cognizance of a circuit

or district court of the United States sitting therein, it shall be transferred to the one or the other of

said courts sitting within said State of Arizona, with due regard for the general provisions of law

defining their respective jurisdiction; but should such case or controversy be by nature one of those

which under such general jurisdictional provisions fall within the concurrent, but not the exclusive,

jurisdiction of such courts, then such transfer may be had upon application of any party to such case

or controversy, to be made as nearly as may be in the manner now provided for removal of cases from

State to federal courts, and not later than sixty days after the lodgment of the record of such case or

controversy in the proper court of the State as herein provided. All cases and controversies pending at

the admission of the State, and not transferable to the said circuit or district court under the foregoing

provisions, shall be heard and determined by the proper court of the State. All files, records and

proceedings relating to any such pending cases or controversies shall be transferred to such circuit,

district, and state courts, respectively, in such wise and so authenticated or proven as such courts shall

respectively by rule direct, and upon transfer of any case or controversy as herein provided the same

shall be proceeded with in due course of law; and no writ, action, indictment, information, cause or

proceeding pending in any court of the said Territory at the time of its admission as a State shall abate

or be deemed ineffective by reason of such admission, but the same shall be transferred and

proceeded with in the proper circuit or district court of the United States or state court, as the case

may be: Provided, however, that all cases pending and undisposed of in the supreme court of the said

Territory at the time of the admission thereof as a State shall be transferred, together with the records

thereof, to the highest appellate court of the State, and shall be heard and determined thereby, and

appeal to and writ of error from the supreme court of the United States shall lie to review all such

cases in accordance with the rules and principles applicable to the review by that tribunal of cases

determined by state courts: Provided, further, that all cases so pending in said Territorial supreme

court in which the United States is a party or which, if instituted within a State, would have fallen

within the exclusive original cognizance of a circuit or district court of the United States, shall, with

the records appertaining thereto, be transferred to the circuit court of appeals for the ninth circuit, and

be there heard and decided; and any such case which, if finally decided by the supreme court of the

Territory, would have been in any manner reviewable by the supreme court of the United States may,

in like manner and with like effect, be so reviewed after final decision thereof by said circuit court of

appeals. Transfers of all files and records from the said Territorial supreme court to the highest

appellate court of the State and to the said circuit court of appeals shall be accomplished in such

manner and under such proofs and authentications as the two last-mentioned courts shall respectively

by rule prescribe.

All civil causes of action and all criminal offenses which shall have arisen or been committed

prior to the admission of said Territory as a State, but as to which no suit, action, or prosecution be.10

pending at the date of such admission, shall be subject to prosecution in the courts of said State and

the said circuit or district courts of the United States sitting therein, and to review in the appellate

courts of such respective sovereignties in like manner and to the same extent as if said State had been

created and such circuit, district, and state courts had been established prior to the accrual of such

cases of action and the commission of such offenses; and in effectuation of this provision such of the

said criminal offenses as shall have been committed against the laws of the said Territory shall be

tried and punished by the appropriate courts of the said State, and such as shall have been committed

against the laws of the United States shall be tried and punished in the circuit or district courts of the

United States.

All suits and actions brought by the United States in which said Territory is named as a party

defendant which shall be pending in any court of said Territory at the date of its admission hereunto

shall be transferred as herein provided, and the said State shall be substituted therein and become a

party defendant thereto in lieu of said Territory.

Sec. 34.

Sec. 34. That the members of the Legislature elected at the election hereinbefore provided for

may assemble at Phoenix, organize and elect two Senators of the United States, in the manner now

prescribed by the Constitution and laws of the United States; and the governor and secretary of state

of the proposed State shall certify the election of the Senators and Representatives in the manner

required by law, and the Senators and Representatives so elected shall he entitled to be admitted to

seats in Congress and to all rights and privileges of Senators and Representatives of other States in the

Congress of the United States; and the officers of the State government formed in pursuance of said

Constitution, as provided by the Constitutional Convention, shall proceed to exercise all the functions

of State officers; and all laws of said Territory in force at the time of its admission into the Union

shall be in force in said State until changed by the Legislature of said State, except as modified or

changed by this Act or by the constitution of the State; and the laws of the United States shall have

the same force and effect within the said State as elsewhere within the United States.

Sec. 35.

Sec. 35. That the sum of one hundred thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary,

is hereby appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for defraying all

and every kind and character of expense incident to the elections and conventions provided for in this

Act; that is, the payment of the expenses of holding the election for members of the constitutional

convention and the election for the ratification of the constitution, at the same rates that are paid for

similar services under the territorial laws, and for the payment of the mileage for and salaries of

members of the constitutional convention, at the same rates that are paid to members of the said

territorial legislature under national law, and for the payment of all proper and necessary expenses,

officers, clerks, and messengers thereof, and printing and other expenses incident thereto: Provided,

that any expense incurred in excess of said sum of one hundred thousand dollars shall be paid by said

State. The said money shall be expended under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, and shall

be forwarded to be locally expended in the present Territory of Arizona, through the Secretary of said

Territory, as may be necessary and proper in the discretion of the Secretary of the Interior, in order to

carry out the full intent and meaning of this Act.